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Post Info TOPIC: Wideband O2 sensor controller


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RE: Wideband O2 sensor controller
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I puit together the dispaly tonight, the silkscreen is well marked so it didn't take too long.

The kit:

NAW 7S wideband kit

The back of the display:

 

Wide Band Controller

The front of the display:

Digital AFR display

 

Now to find a housing.



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1984 Suzuki SJ413K pick up, 1.6 16V Baleno engine
2000 Suzuki Vitara 1.6 8V, many mods
2004 Suzuki Ignis 1.5VVT 4Grip
2006 Suzuki Jimny 1.3VVT JLX+
and many more.



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Wideband O2 Controller
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Naw_7S datasheet:

http://www.rhinopower.org/WBO2/NAW_7S_User_Manual_Oct_3_2009.pdf

 The lambda output voltage can be calibrated as shown on page 11

 

My plan now is to modify the Vitara's ECU code to utilise the WBO2 sensor 5V linear output to control closed loop fuelling and to output the sensor voltage on the SDL interface so it can be logged against the other data.



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1984 Suzuki SJ413K pick up, 1.6 16V Baleno engine
2000 Suzuki Vitara 1.6 8V, many mods
2004 Suzuki Ignis 1.5VVT 4Grip
2006 Suzuki Jimny 1.3VVT JLX+
and many more.



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Air-Fuel Equivalence Ratio - this can be output via an OBD2 PID.

Air-Fuel equivalence ratio, λ, is the ratio of actual AFR to stoichiometry for a given mixture. λ= 1.0 is at stoichiometry, rich mixtures λ < 1.0, and lean mixtures λ > 1.0.

There is a direct relationship between λ and AFR. To calculate AFR from a given λ, multiply the measured λ by the stoichiometric AFR for that fuel. Alternatively, to recover λ from an AFR, divide AFR by the stoichiometric AFR for that fuel. This last equation is often used as the definition of λ:

\lambda = \frac{AFR}{AFR_{stoich}}

Because the composition of common fuels varies seasonally, and because many modern vehicles can handle different fuels, when tuning, it makes more sense to talk about λ values rather than AFR.

Most practical AFR devices actually measure the amount of residual oxygen (for lean mixes) or unburnt hydrocarbons (for rich mixtures) in the exhaust gas as know in PPCHS.

PID 0124 is the lambda reading/commanded lambda for O2S1



__________________

1984 Suzuki SJ413K pick up, 1.6 16V Baleno engine
2000 Suzuki Vitara 1.6 8V, many mods
2004 Suzuki Ignis 1.5VVT 4Grip
2006 Suzuki Jimny 1.3VVT JLX+
and many more.



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from the Bosch motorsport website:

Unlike serial production vehicles, we control our engines in the slightly rich field of lambda = 0.9, since it has the highest performance potential. Lambda sensors reliably analyze the exhaust gas, providing data on the current lambda value. Wide-band lambda sensors even have a measurement range of lambda = 0.7 to infinity.

 

Most sensors output a voltage between 0 and 1.0 volts (usually .10 to .90), 0v - .45v for lean conditions, and .55v - 1.00v for rich conditions. :

Lambda versus voltage

The output from the lambda sensor during closed loop control typically looks like this:

Narrowband O2 plot

 



-- Edited by Rhinoman on Thursday 14th of February 2013 03:42:49 PM

__________________

1984 Suzuki SJ413K pick up, 1.6 16V Baleno engine
2000 Suzuki Vitara 1.6 8V, many mods
2004 Suzuki Ignis 1.5VVT 4Grip
2006 Suzuki Jimny 1.3VVT JLX+
and many more.



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The term "wideband O2 controller" is a bit of a misnomer - in that the device does not control the O2 in any way - think of it as a "wideband O2 sensor controller".

Narrow band O2 sensors are less expensive than wideband and as a result much more common, but, because of their narrow range they provide less information to the ECU, which is not normally a problem on a standard or unmodified engine, because the mixture requirements are reasonably well established.

On a modified engine, especially one that is being setup for the first time, the tuner will have only a rough idea as to where the mixture settings should be - a narrow band O2 sensor in this application will only tell him lean or rich, but not how lean or how rich, wheras a wide band sensor will provide that information.

What the wideband O2 controller does is provide the control circuitry required to drive the sensor itself - and will usually have an output to drive a display and an interface to a narrow band input on an ECU.

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Sorry need to ask, how does this control the o2? is a sort of buffer in between the o2 sensor and ecu to give you more scope? to allow a level of adjustment?
can the bosch o2 sensor be accessed direct via your inhouse ecu ?
Grim



Nothing to do with o2 or ecu, how can i default to email me when there is a reply?

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Wideband O2 sensor controller
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I ordered a Wideband controller today. I've opted for the NAW_7S controller primarily because it is the cheapest around and I like the concept behind it. The early versions of the JAW controller came in for some critisism but this one is an updated version. I will see how I get on with it, if I don't like some aspects of it then I'll modify it.
The plan is to modify the code in my ECU and use the WB O2 controller's 5V output straight into the old narrow band input. This will allow accurate logging of AFR against load and RPM.

http://www.14point7.com/Widebands/NAW_7S/NAW_7S.htm



__________________

1984 Suzuki SJ413K pick up, 1.6 16V Baleno engine
2000 Suzuki Vitara 1.6 8V, many mods
2004 Suzuki Ignis 1.5VVT 4Grip
2006 Suzuki Jimny 1.3VVT JLX+
and many more.

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